Cryptographic transfer of sensor data from the Amulet to a smartphone

David Harmon ’17 develops and evaluates a novel protocol for secure transfer of sensor data from an Amulet to a smartphone, in this Senior Honors Thesis released as a Dartmouth Computer Science Technical Report.

Abstract. The authenticity, confidentiality, and integrity of data streams from wearable healthcare devices are critical to patients, researchers, physicians, and others who depend on this data to measure the effectiveness of treatment plans and clinical trials. Many forms of mHealth data are highly sensitive; in the hands of unintended parties such data may reveal indicators of a patient’s disorder, disability, or identity. Furthermore, if a malicious party tampers with the data, it can affect the diagnosis or treatment of patients, or the results of a research study. Although existing network protocols leverage encryption for confidentiality and integrity, network-level encryption does not provide end-to-end security from the device, through the smartphone and database, to downstream data consumers. In this thesis we provide a new open protocol that provides end-to-end authentication, confidentiality, and integrity for healthcare data in such a pipeline.

We present and evaluate a prototype implementation to demonstrate this protocol’s feasibility on low-power wearable devices, and present a case for the system’s ability to meet critical security properties under a specific adversary model and trust assumptions.

Advisor: David Kotz.

This entry was posted in People, Publications and tagged , , , , by David Kotz. Bookmark the permalink.

About David Kotz

David Kotz is the Pat and John Rosenwald Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Dartmouth College. He previously served as Interim Provost, as Associate Dean of the Faculty for the Sciences, as the Executive Director of the Institute for Security Technology Studies, and on the US Healthcare IT Policy Committee. His research interests include security and privacy, pervasive computing for healthcare, and wireless networks. He has published over 230 refereed papers, obtained over $80m in grant funding, and mentored nearly 100 research students. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Distinguished Member of the ACM, a 2008 Fulbright Fellow to India, a 2019 Visiting Professor at ETH Zurich, and an elected member of Phi Beta Kappa. He received his AB in Computer Science and Physics from Dartmouth in 1986, and his PhD in Computer Science from Duke University in 1991.

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